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  • Andrea Acri

    Andrea Acri

    Andrea Acri obtained his doctorate at the University of Leiden in 2011, and held various research and teaching positions in India (Nalanda University), Singapore (Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre and National Unversity of Singapore), and Australia (ANU). He has authored articles in international academic journals and published edited volumes on Shaiva and Buddhist tantric traditions in South and Southeast Asia, as well as wider cultural and historical dynamics of Intra-Asian connectivity. His monograph Dharma Pātañjala: A Śaiva Scripture from Ancient Java Studied in the Light of Related Old Javanese and Sanskrit Texts, originally appeared in the Gonda Indological Studies Series (Egbert Forsten/Brill, 2011), has been recently republished in India by Aditya Prakashan (New Delhi, 2017) and translated into Indonesian (EFEO/KPG, Jakarta, 2018).

  • Nancy Adajania

    Nancy Adajania

    Nancy Adajania is a cultural theorist, art critic and independent curator. She has written and lectured extensively on new media, extended sculpture and public art at numerous venues, including Documenta 11, Kassel; Zentrum fur Kunst und Medientechnologie/ZKM, Karlsruhe and Kunstlerhaus Wien, Vienna. Adajania is the editor of Shilpa Gupta (Prestel, 2010) and co-author of The Dialogues Series with Ranjit Hoskote (Popular/ foundation b&g, 2011).

  • Roda Ahluwalia

    Roda Ahluwalia

    Roda Ahluwalia has a Masters degree from SOAS, London, and is a Member of the Board of Governors at the K R Cama Oriental Institute, Mumbai where she recently presented a paper and organised a seminar on the Art and Culture of Mughal India. The seminar attracted renowned international scholars and Roda is presently editing the proceeds for publication. She is the author of Rajput Painting, Romantic, Divine and Courtly Art from India as well as articles related to Rajput painting and Ramayana manuscripts. She has worked on projects at the British Museum, the CSMVS at Mumbai, the National Museum of Singapore and the British Library. She has delivered lectures at SOAS, the British Museum, the CSMVS and has taught at SOAS as well as at the Birkbeck University Adult Education Course, 2003-04. She is currently researching a sub-imperial Mughal illustrated Ramayana manuscript.

  • Naman Ahuja

    Naman Ahuja

    Naman P. Ahuja is Professor of Indian Art and Architecture at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. His book, The Making of the Modern Indian Artist-Craftsman: Devi Prasad (Routledge, 2011). Some of his other publications include: Divine Presence, The Arts of India and the Himalayas (Five continents editions, Milan, 2003, translated into Catalan and Spanish) and The Body in Indian Art and Thought (Ludion, Antwerp, 2013, also available in French and Dutch). He has held Fellowships, Visiting Professorships and curatorial charges at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, The British Museum, the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of Zurich, the Kusnthistorisches Institut in Florence, amongst others. He has curated various acclaimed exhibitions, the most recent of which, The Body in Indian Art was shown at the Palais des Beaux Arts in Brussels for Europalia.13 and, in 2014, at the National Museum, New Delhi. It explored the formation of the Arts and Crafts Movement and how it, in turn impacted the aesthetic and political influences of Coomaraswamy, Gandhi and Tagore as shown in the pedagogy of the institutions of Santiniketan and Sevagram.

    His research and graduate teaching focus on periods of artistic / visual exchange in pre-modern societies like ancient Gandhara on the borderlands of Afghanistan and Punjab and in the manuscripts painted in the Sultanate period in India. His studies on early Indian terracottas, ivories and small finds have drawn attention to unique sources for Indian history that reveal much about the private world of Ancient Indians. These objects tell us about the trade and ritual cultures from a domestic sphere rather than what is normally understood only through public monuments.

  • Suad Amiry

    Suad Amiry

    Suad Amiry has lived most of her life between Amman, Damascus, Beirut and Cairo and now lives in Ramallah, Palestine. Amiry is the founder of the Palestinian NGO RIWAQ, a winner of the 2013 Aga Khan award for Architecture. Riwaq documents conserves and rehabilitates historic buildings and centers in rural Palestine. She’s also the author of Sharon and My Mother in Law, which won the prestigious Premeo Viareggio award.

  • Arjun Appadurai

    Arjun Appadurai

    Arjun Appadurai is Paulette Goddard Professor of Media, Culture and Communication at New York University and Professor of Anthropology and Globalization at The Hertie School of Governance (Berlin). He is the author of numerous books and articles on globalization, media, cities, and ethnic violence. He was born in Mumbai, and studied at St. Xavier's High School and Elphinstone College, before pursuing his higher studies in the United States. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His latest book is Banking on Words: The Failure of Language in the Age of Derivative Finance (Chicago, 2016).

  • Samhita Arni

    Samhita Arni

    When she was eight, Samhita Arni started writing and illustrating her first book. The Mahabharata - A Child's View, (Tara Books, 1996) went on to be published in seven language editions and sell 50,000 copies worldwide, winning the Elsa Morante Literary Award, and receiving commendations from the German Academy for Youth Literature and Media and The Spanish Ministry of Culture. Samhita's second book, Sita's Ramayana, a graphic novel developed in collaboration with Patua Artist Moyna Chitrakar, was published by Tara Books in 2011. Her third book and first novel, a speculative fiction feminist thriller, also based on the Ramayana, is forthcoming from Zubaan in 2012.

  • Timothy Garton Ash

    Timothy Garton Ash

    Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies in the University of Oxford, Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St Antony's College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is the author of ten books of political writing or ‘history of the present’ including 'The Magic Lantern: The Revolution of ’89 Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin, & Prague', 'The File: A Personal History', 'In Europe’s Name and Facts are Subversive'. He writes a column on international affairs in the 'Guardian', which is widely syndicated, and is a regular contributor to the 'New York Review of Books', amongst other journals. He leads the 13-language Oxford University research project Freespeechdebate.com, and his latest book is 'Free Speech: Ten Principles for a Connected World'. Awards he has received for his writing include the George Orwell Prize.

  • Sussan Babaie

    Sussan Babaie

    Sussan Babaie is Reader in Islamic and Persian arts at The Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London. Before joining The Courtauld in 2013, she taught at Smith College, the University of Michigan, and Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. She has curated the exhibition Strolling in Isfahan at the Sackler Museum of Harvard University, and installations of Islamic arts at Smith College and the University of Michigan Museum of Art.
    She is the author of Isfahan and Its Palaces: Statecraft, Shi‘ism and the Architecture of Conviviality in Early Modern Iran (2008 and paperback 2018), and co-author and editor of several books including Iran After the Mongols(2019), The Mercantile Effect: On Art and Exchange in the Islamicate World During the 17th and 18th Centuries (2017),Honar: The Afkhami Collection of Modern and Contemporary Iranian Art (2017), Persian Kingship and Architecture: Strategies of Power in Iran from the Achaemenids to the Pahlavis (2014), Shirin Neshat (2013), and Slaves of the Shah: New Elites of Safavid Iran (2004, paperback 2018). Currently, she is working on a book about the intersections between visual and gustatory taste in early modern Iran.
    Babaie studied Graphic Design (BA, Tehran University), History of Renaissance Arts (MA, American University, Washington, DC), and History of Islamic Arts (PhD, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University). Her research has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (United States), the Fulbright (for Egypt and Syria) and the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles.

  • Amol N. Bankar

    Amol N. Bankar

    Mr. Amol N. Bankar is an Indological researcher working in the domains of Epigraphy and Numismatics with his prime focus on pre-modern Maharashtra. Bankar has contributed more than 25 articles on coins and epigraphy in leading National and International Journals. He is a visiting scholar at Wolfson College, University of Oxford. He has been studying the hagiographies of Nathasiddhas and is writing a monograph on 'Nathasiddha tradition of early medieval Maharashtra'.

  • Arghya Basu

    Arghya Basu

    Arghya Basu (1971 - 2019) worked in Asian Aesthetics, Buddhism and Comparative Religion, and socio-linguistics; he wrote and practised integrating text and life. He taught Film at various academic institutions, and worked with the intangible visceral in Cinema.

  • Christopher Bayly

    Christopher Bayly

    Prof. Sir Christopher Bayly (1945 - 2015) — K.B., DPhil., Litt. D (Cantab.), FBA, FRHist Soc., FRSL. was Professor, Lecturer, Reader of History and Fellow at the University of Cambridge since 1970. He held visiting positions at several universities in Europe and the U.S. and was most recently elected Vivekananda Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago and Visiting Professor at the Queen Mary University of London. He has published a number of books on the intellectual and social history of South Asia, most recent amongst which is titled ‘Recovering Liberties. Indian thought in the age of liberalism and empire’ (2011). His current research work is provisionally titled: ‘The Transformation of the Modern World: crisis and achievement, 1900-2014’. In 2007, he was appointed Knight Bachelor ‘for services to history outside Europe.’

  • Susan S Bean

    Susan S Bean

    Dr. Susan Bean is the Chair, Center for Art and Archaeology, American Institute of Indian
    Studies, Gurugram, India, since 2014. She was the Curator, South Asian and Korean Art at the Peabody Essex Museum where she curated several path-breaking exhibitions and is a recipient of numerous grants and fellowships. Lectured widely, her numerous publications are a testimony to her wide ranging scholarship.

  • Homi K. Bhabha

    Homi K. Bhabha

    Homi K. Bhabha is the Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of the Humanities in the Department of English, the Director of the Mahindra Humanities Center and the Senior Advisor on the Humanities to the President and Provost at Harvard University. Bhabha is the author of numerous works exploring postcolonial theory, cultural change and power, and cosmopolitanism, among other themes. Some of his works include Nation and Narration and The Location of Culture, which was reprinted as a Routeledge Classic in 2004. Harvard University Press will publish his forthcoming book A Global Measure, and Columbia University Press will publish his next book The Right to Narrate.

  • Aniket Bhagwat

    Aniket Bhagwat

    Aniket Bhagwat is a third-generation landscape architect at M/S Prabhakar B. Bhagwat which is a landscape design firm with a lineage of over eight decades. It is arguably, the most influential landscape design firm in the country, setting standards in its field. As a firm they have also defined and established several design typologies. Being involved in some important planning projects, since over a decade, they have accepted select architectural commissions, which have also been critically acclaimed by national and international press. Bhagwat has been instrumental in areas of architectural writing and research as well, with publications like SPADE and LEAF, and the 12X12 speakers’ platform. He has been a speaker at many forums, and works towards exploring new idioms and typologies, as well as collaborative design processes.

  • Shailendra Bhandare

    Shailendra Bhandare

    Shailendra Bhandare is Assistant Keeper, South Asian and Far-eastern Numismatics and Paper Money Collections, a Fellow of St Cross College and a member of Faculty of Oriental Studies. He started his career as a Numismatist with a visiting fellowship at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge. He was then appointed as a post-doctoral fellow of the Society for South Asian Studies, and worked as a curator in the British Museum on the coins of Later Mughals and the Indian Princely States. He was appointed as curator in the Ashmolean Museum in 2002.
    He was born and brought in Mumbai, India where he received his first degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences. He holds a Master’s degree in History and a Doctorate in Ancient Indian Culture from the University of Mumbai. His research interests span a very wide range of topics on Indian Numismatics and Monetary History, Art and Epigraphy and he has made contribution to several publications and conferences. His recent contributions include:
    1. Space for Change: Evaluating the 'Paucity of Metallic Currency' in Medieval India – in ‘Negotiating Cultural Identity: Landscapes in Early Medieval South Asian History’, ed. Himanshu P Ray, Routledge, 2015
    2. Shaking the Pagoda Tree: Trees and Foliate Motifs on Indian Coins – in ‘Roots of Wisdom, Branches of Devotion: Plant Life in South Asian Traditions’, eds. Fabrizzio Ferrari and Thomas Dähnhardt, Equinox Publishing, 2016

  • Kaushik Bhaumik

    Kaushik Bhaumik

    Kaushik Bhaumik is Vice President, Osian's - Connoisseurs of Art. He has published articles on Indian and World Cinema in various anthologies. He is co-editor of Visual Sense: A Cultural Reader due later this year from Berg Publishers, Oxford.

  • Akeel Bilgrami

    Akeel Bilgrami

    Akeel Bilgrami got a B.A in English Literature from Elphinstone College, Bombay University and went to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar where he read Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. He has a Ph.D in Philosophy from the University of Chicago. He is the Sidney Morgenbesser Chair of Philosophy at Columbia University, where he is also a Professor on the Committee on Global Thought. He was the Director of the Humanities Center at Columbia University for seven years and is currently the Director of its South Asian Institute. His publications include the books Belief and Meaning (1992), Self-Knowledge and Resentment (2006), Democratic Culture (2012), and Secularism, Identity and Enchantment (2014). He is due to publish two short books in the near future: What is a Muslim? and Gandhi's Integrity. His long-term future work is on the relations between agency, value, rationality, and politics.

  • Ilker Evrim Binbaş

    Ilker Evrim Binbaş

    Evrim Binbaş received his PhD degree from the University of Chicago, and after seven years at Royal Holloway, University of London, he moved to the Institute of Oriental and Asian Studies at the University of Bonn. He studies early modern Islamic history with a particular focus on the Timurid dynasty in the fifteenth century. His first book on the Timurid historian Sharaf al-Din ‘Ali Yazdi (d. 1454) was published by the Cambridge University Press (Intellectual Networks in Timurid Iran: Sharaf al-Dīn 'AlīYazdī and the Islamicate Republic of Letters). The Intellectual Networks in Timurid Iran won the 2017 British-Kuwait Friendship Society Prize in Middle Eastern Studies, and it was shortlisted for the 2017 Gladstone Prize by the Royal Historical Society in Britain, and for the 2017-2018 Book of the Year Award in Iranian Studies by the National Library and Archives of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Currently he is working on three different book projects. Together with John E. Woods of the University of Chicago he is preparing a critical edition of Yazdi’sZayl-iZafarnama, which is the second and so-far unpublished volume of the Zafarnama. He is also editing, also together with John E. Woods, a handbook on Timurid dynasty titled The Timurid Dynasty: A Handbook. The book was commissioned by Brill in Leiden, and when it is published, it will include contributions from more than thirty scholars working on the early modern Islamic history. Finally, he is preparing a monograph on early modern Islamicate political ideas.

  • Kamalika Bose

    Kamalika Bose

    Kamalika Bose is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Design, CEPT University, Ahmedabad (since 2008). Her research focuses on urban heritage and conservation issues for historic cities in India. She received an MA in Historic Preservation Planning from Cornell University where she was a Fulbright Scholar (2011-13). Her interest in ethnic history and heritage were further sharpened during internships at the Smithsonian Institution and Historic Districts Council in New York. This talk is based on her recent monograph Cheenapara: Cultural Identity & Urban Heritage of the Chinese in Calcutta.

  • Pia Brancaccio

    Pia Brancaccio

    Pia Brancaccio is Professor in the Department of Art and Art History at Drexel University in Philadelphia, USA. She earned her Ph.D. in Indian Art History and Archaeology at the Universita’ degliStudi di Napoli ‘L’Orientale’ (Italy). She has done extensive research on Buddhist art in ancient South Asia with a special focus on the ancient regions of Gandhara and the Deccan plateau. Dr. Brancaccio’s publications include a monograph on The Buddhist Caves at Aurangabad: Transformations in Art and Religion (Brill Publishers, 2010), two edited volumes entitled Living Rock: Buddhist, Hindu and Jain Cave Temples in Western Deccan (Marg, 2013), and Gandharan Buddhism: Archaeology, Art and Text with Kurt Behrendt (UBC Press, 2006) as well as several book chapters and articles in conference proceedings and academic journals (Ars Orientalis, Archives of Asian Art, East and West, and South Asian Studies, among others). She is currently working on the topic on Buddhist Monumentality in early South Asia, and most recently she delivered the 2019 Distinguished Lecture on the Arts of South and Southeast Asia at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

  • Raymond Brassier

    Raymond Brassier

    Raymond Brassier is a member of the philosophy faculty at the American University of Beirut, Lebanon. He is the author of Nihil Unbound: Enlightenment and Extinction and the translator of Alain Badiou's 'Saint Paul: The Foundation of Universalism and Theoretical Writings' and Quentin Meillassoux's 'After Finitude: An Essay on the Necessity of Contingency.'

  • David Bromwich

    David Bromwich

    David Bromwich is the Sterling Professor of English at Yale University. His publications include 'Hazlitt: the Mind of a Critic' (Oxford University Press, 1983), 'A Choice of Inheritance: Self and Community from Edmund Burke to Robert Frost' (Harvard University Press, 1989), 'Politics by Other Means: Higher Education and Group Thinking' (Yale University Press, 1992), 'Disowned by Memory: Wordsworth's Poetry of the 1790s' (University of Chicago Press, 1998) and 'Skeptical Music: Essays on Modern Poetry' (University of Chicago Press, 2001). Skeptical Music won him the 2002 PEN Spielvogel/Diamonstein prize for best book of essays. Among the honours he has received are the Blumenthal Prize (1976) and a Guggenheim Fellowship for work on romantic and modern poetry (1986-87).

  • Mirjam Brusius

    Mirjam Brusius

    Dr Mirjam Brusius is a research fellow in Colonial and Global History at the German Historical Institute London, and currently sponsored through its India Visiting fellowship programme. She holds degrees in History of Art and Cultural Studies (MA Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin 2007) and History and Philosophy of Science (PhD University of Cambridge 2011). Her current interests concern the history of archaeology, the history of heritage, the history of photography, and the tensions between preservation and destruction in the Middle East and Europe. She recently co-edited (with Kavita Singh) 'Museum Storage and Meaning: Tales from the Crypt' (Routledge, 2018).

  • Bonnie Burnham

    Bonnie Burnham

    Bonnie Burnham is President of World Monuments Fund and has led its international historic preservation work since 1985, when she joined the organization as Executive Director. She holds degrees in the history of art from the University of Florida and the Université de Paris-Sorbonne.She has been honored as a Chevalier of the French Order of Arts and Letters, is a Distinguished Alumna of the College of Fine Arts of the University of Florida, and is the first recipient of its Beinecke-Reeves Distinguished Achievement Award in Historic Preservation. She received the Founders Award for Civic Leadership from Partners for Livable Communities in 2013. She holds an honorary doctorate from Florida Southern College.

  • Himanshu Burte

    Himanshu Burte

    Himanshu Burte is an architect, critic and urbanist teaching at the School of Habitat Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS), Mumbai. His book, Space for Engagement: The Indian Artplace and a Habitational Approach to Architecture (Seagull Books, 2008. Kolkata), proposes an alternative conceptual framework for architecture centred on the act of dwelling. A former Fulbright Fellow with a Ph. D. in Urban Planning (CEPT University, Ahmedabad), Burte has published extensively in the professional, popular and academic press for over twenty five years. His research interests include modernism, public space, urban infrastructure, housing policy, theatre architecture and sustainable urbanism. He is a member of the Editorial Advisory Panel of Marg Publications.

  • Thomas P. Campbell

    Thomas P. Campbell

    Thomas P. Campbell became the ninth Director of The Metropolitan Museum of Art on January 1, 2009. Before becoming Director, Dr. Campbell had worked in the Metropolitan's Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts for fourteen years, rising steadily through the curatorial ranks as Assistant Curator (1995-97), Associate Curator (1997-2003), and Curator (2003 to December 2008). During this time, he conceived and organized the major exhibitions Tapestry in the Renaissance: Art and Magnificence (2002) and Tapestry in the Baroque: Threads of Splendor (2007).

  • Sheila Canby

    Sheila Canby

    In October 2009 Dr. Sheila Canby was appointed Patti Cadby Birch Curator in Charge of the Islamic Art Metropolitan Museum of Art, having served as Curator of Islamic Art and Antiquities at the British Museum from 1991 to 2009. Her department’s new galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia and Later South Asia opened in 2011. Her publications include Shah `Abbas and the Imperial Treasures of Iran (2009) Islamic Art in Detail (2005), Hunt for Paradise: Court Arts of Safavid Iran, 1501-76, co-editor with Jon Thompson (2003), The Golden Age of Persian Art, 1501-1722 (1999), Persian Painting (1993) and The Shahnama of Shah Tahmasp (2011 and 2014). In spring-summer 2016 she co-curated the special exhibition, “Court and Cosmos: the Great Age of the Seljuqs”, and co-authored the catalogue with curators Deniz Beyazit and Martina Rugiadi.

  • Nachiket Chanchani

    Nachiket Chanchani

    Dr. Nachiket Chanchani is Assistant Professor of South Asian Art and Visual Culture at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. For the 2012-13 academic year, he has received research leave from the University in order to hold a Smithsonian Institution History of Art Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Freer and Sackler Galleries in Washington, DC.

  • Christopher Key Chapple

    Christopher Key Chapple

    Christopher Key Chapple is Doshi Professor of Indic and Comparative Theology and Director of the Master of Arts in Yoga Studies at Loyola Marymount University. He has published more than twenty books, including Karma and Creativity (1986) and Yoga and the Luminous (2008). He serves as academic advisor to the International Summer School for Jain Studies (Delhi) and as editor for the journal Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology (Brill).

  • Mortimer Chatterjee

    Mortimer Chatterjee

    Mortimer Chatterjee received his Masters in the History of Indian Art and Architecture from the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. In 2003 he and his wife, Tara, began Chatterjee & Lal. Today based in Colaba’s art district of Mumbai, the gallery’s program is focused both on the work of emerging artists and historical material. His recent projects have included a co-authored publication on the art collection of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research along with an exhibition of that collection at the National Gallery of Modern Art, Mumbai.

  • Shilpa Chedda

    Shilpa Chedda

    Shilpa Chheda has been teaching Jainism for over 20 years. She is the Coordinator of the Jainology Diploma and Certificate Course held at the Department of Philosophy, University of Mumbai. She is also the Curator at the Heras Institute of Indian History and Culture, St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai. She has a background in Jaina Art and Aesthetics, Comparative Mythology and World Religions.

  • Swati Chemburkar

    Swati Chemburkar

    Swati Chemburkar is an architectural historian whose work focuses on Southeast Asia, especially Cambodia. Her primary interest lies in religious culture and architecture of Jayavaraman VII. Presently, she directs a post-graduate diploma on Southeast Asian Art and Architecture at Jnanapravaha, Mumbai. She has lectured at many prestigious institutes and presented her research at several conferences. She is the editor of Art of Cambodia: Interactions with India, MARG, 2015-2016. Some of her publications include, “Borobudur’s Pāla Forebear? A Field Note from Kesariya, Bihar, India” in Esoteric Buddhism in Mediaeval Maritime Asia, Ed. Andrea Acri, 2016, “Dancing Architecture: ‘Hall with Dancers’ ” in Jayavarman VII’s temples, Journal of South East Asian Studies, 2015, and “Banteay Chhmar: Ritual space of the temple” in Banteay Chhmar: The Last Great Forest Temple, Ed. Peter Sharrock, 2014.

  • Padmini Chettur

    Padmini Chettur

    Padmini Chettur began her contemporary dance career in 1990 with Chandralekha, the radical modernist, Bharatanatyam choreographer whose oeuvre deconstructed the form of Bharatanatyam. Breaking away from Chandralekha’s work in 2001, Padmini’s practice shifted the choreographic tradition to a minimal language that has visually translated concepts of time and space as they relate to contemporary experience. Deriving vocabularies from phenomenology, cultural studies, insect movements, astronomy, physiotherapy, and sport, she has created a taut visual language that exits the narrow bounds of the stage. During her career as a choreographer, spanning two decades, she collaborated with sculptors, light artists, filmmakers, and sound-artists. Her approach to movement research is scientific in rigueur. From Wings and Masks (1993) throughout her oeuvre, Padmini has been concerned with refining form through experiments with the body.

  • Lorenzo Chiesa

    Lorenzo Chiesa

    Lorenzo Chiesa is Director of the GSH – Genoa School of Humanities and Visiting Professor at the European University at St Petersburg and at the Freud’s Dream Museum of the same city. He was previously Professor of Modern European Thought at the University of Kent, where he founded and directed the Centre for Critical Thought. He also held visiting positions at a number of other institutions, including the University of New Mexico, the Istituto di Scienze Umane (SUM) of Naples, and the Institute of Philosophy of Ljubljana. He published books and edited collections on Lacan (Subjectivity and Otherness, MIT Press, 2007; Lacan and Philosophy, Re.press, 2014) and on biopolitical thought (The Italian Difference, Re.press, 2009 – with Alberto Toscano; Italian Thought Today, Routledge, 2014). Recently, he published two new books: The Not-Two: Logic and God in Lacan (MIT Press, 2016) and The Virtual Point of Freedom. Essays on Politics, Aesthetics, and Religion (Northwestern UP, 2016). He edited and translated books by Agamben and Virno into English and by Žižek into Italian. His work has been translated into more than ten languages.

  • Indira Chowdhury

    Indira Chowdhury

    Indira Chowdhury heads the Centre for Public History at the Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology, Bangalore. Formerly Professor of English at Jadavpur University, Kolkata, she has a PhD in History from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Her book, The Frail Hero and Virile History (OUP, 1998), was awarded the Tagore Prize in 2001. In 2004, she published The First Promise, a translation of a major Bengali novel by Ashapurna Devi, into English. Her book, Growing the Tree of Science: Homi Bhabha and the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, is forthcoming from Oxford University Press, New Delhi.

  • Radiclani Clytus

    Radiclani Clytus

    Radiclani Clytus works at the intersections of new media and nineteenth-century American literature and visual culture. He has written extensively on transatlantic abolitionist imagery and is the editor of two compilations of prose by Pulitzer Prize winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa: Blue Notes: Essays, Interviews, and Commentaries (2000) and Condition Red (2017). His current book manuscripts Graphic Slavery: American Abolitionism and the Primacy of the Visual and Old Media New Artists respectively examine the ocular-centric roots of antislavery rhetoric and the history of innovation and contingency in black expressive culture. As a documentary filmmaker, Radiclani Clytus has received commissions from Luhring Augustine, Steinway & Sons, and the United States National Park Service. His first film, Looks of a Lot, premiered at the Hirshhorn National Museum of Modern Art and his latest feature, Grammar, explores the interdisciplinary language of creative expression. He is the principal of RoundO Films LLC.

  • Darius Cooper

    Darius Cooper

    Dr. Darius Cooper is a writer and film scholar. He completed a Masters in Literature and Aesthetics at Bombay University in 1972 before getting a second Masters in Film and Literature at the University of Southern California in 1982. He completed his PhD there in 1989 and since then has held a position as Professor of Critical Thinking, Humanities and Film in the English Department of San Diego Mesa College. He has published a number of books including Between Modernity and Tradition: The cinema of Satyajit Ray (Cambridge University Press, 2000), In Black and White: Hollywood Melodrama and the cinema of Guru Dutt (Seagull Books, 2004) and The Fuss About Queens and Other Stories (OM Books International, 2014).

  • Pravina Cooper

    Pravina Cooper

    Dr. Cooper received a Doctorate in Comparative World Literatures and Film Studies in October 2005 from UCLA. Her teaching interests include Genres in Film and Theater, critical theory, transnational literatures. She currently teaches comparative literature, theater and film in the Comparative World Literatures Department at California State University Long Beach . She has read papers on cinema and contemporary television's "Mad Men" series, American Comedy genre and Bollywood cinema. She has published in journals such as Asian Cinema and Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies.

  • Joan Copjec

    Joan Copjec

    Joan Copjec is Professor of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University. Author of 'Read My Desire: Lacan against the Historicists; Imagine There's No Woman'; and the forthcoming 'Cloud: Between Paris and Tehran', she was also editor of the S book series published by Verso; Umbr(a), a journal of Lacanian theory; and October, a journal of art/theory/criticism/politics. Before moving to Brown, she was Director of the Center for Psychoanalysis and Culture at the University at Buffalo.

  • Matthijs Cornelissen

    Matthijs Cornelissen

    Matthijs Cornelissen is a Dutch physician who settled in India in 1976. In 1981 he co-founded Mirambika, a research centre for integral education in New-Delhi. He is deeply interested in finding ways to introduce some of the psychological knowledge and know-how that developed as part of the Indian spiritual tradition into academic Psychology. To this end he founded in 2001 the Sri Aurobindo Centre for Consciousness Studies, and in 2006 the Indian Psychology Institute, both in Pondicherry. He organised several conferences, seminars and workshops, gave courses, edited books and published articles related to consciousness studies, yoga-based research methodologies and Indian psychology. Presently he teaches Integral Psychology at the Sri Aurobindo International Centre of Education in Pondicherry and maintains two websites http://ipi.org.in and http://saccs.org.in.

  • Charles Correa

    Charles Correa

    Charles Correa was a major figure in contemporary architecture around the world. His work includes the Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Museum in Ahmedabad, the Jawahar Kala Kendra in Jaipur, Kanchanjunga apartments in Mumbai, the Brain & Cognitive Sciences Center at MIT in Boston, and most recently, the elegant Champalimaud Centre in Lisbon.

    Correa taught at several Universities in India and abroad, including Harvard, MIT and Berkeley, California. In 1985-86 he was appointed Nehru Professor at Cambridge, UK, and from 2000-09 he was Farwell Bemis Professor at MIT, Boston.

    He has received the highest honours of his profession, including the Gold Medal of the RIBA, the Gold Medal of the UIA (International Union of Architects), the Aga Khan Award for Architecture, and the Praemium Imperiale of Japan.

  • Olivier Cunin

    Olivier Cunin

    Olivier Cunin is a qualified architect and holds a PhD in architecture. Since 1997, he has been researching the Khmer monuments, especially the Bayon style (end of the 12th century – beginning of the 13th century) by applying the methods of building archaeology and the scientific techniques of archaeometry. His 2004 thesis ‘From Ta Prohm to Bayon’ compared the architectural history of the Bayon style monuments. The chronology sequence for each monument built in Cambodia and Thailand in the Bayon style was developed on the basis of the mineral skeletons of the temples. In 2008 Cunin worked as a consultant for the Swiss team to design the permanent exhibition and interpretation centre at Banteay Srei. Since 2009, he is engaged with the virtual reconstruction of several Bayon style monuments and has received a prestigious fellowship from Centre for Khmer Studies (CKS) for the same. Along with co-authoring books on the most emblematic monuments of Banteay Chhmar (2005), The Bayon Temple (2007) and Preah Khan of Angkor (2011) he has published several research papers

  • Iftikhar Dadi

    Iftikhar Dadi

    Iftikhar Dadi is Associate Professor in the Department of History of Art, and Chair of the Department of Art at Cornell University. Research interests include postcolonial theory, and modern art and popular culture, with emphasis on South and West Asia. His recent book is Modernism and the Art of Muslim South Asia, and his essays have appeared in numerous journals and edited volumes. As an artist he collaborates with Elizabeth Dadi and has shown widely internationally.

  • Kurush F. Dalal

    Kurush F. Dalal

    Kurush F Dalal has a BA in Ancient Indian History and History from the University of Mumbai), an MA in Archaeology as well as a PhD on the early Iron Age in Rajasthan, both from Pune University. Subsequently he shifted focus to the Early Medieval Period predominantly on the West Coast of India and excavated the sites of Sanjan and Chandore, which has had a strong impact on scholarship in the area. The huge quantities and varieties of ceramics of West Asian and Chinese origins identified alongside the numismatic data have created a seriation which allows new chronological attributions to sites. This database has now allowed archaeologists to identify over 25 coastal sites which belong to the Early Medieval Period. Dr Dalal actively works on Memorial Stones and Ass-curse Stones in India and dabbles in Numismatics, Defence Archaeology, Architecture, Ethnoarchaeology and allied disciplines. He has recently blended his passion for food and archaeology into a research in Culinary Anthropology and Food Archaeology. He is the Co-Director of the Salcette Explorations Project, a massive Urban Archaeology Project documenting the Archaeology of Mumbai since 2015, thus extending his interest from the Medieval into the Colonial Period. He has published over 25 papers and has read many more at National and International Seminars. He is a visiting lecturer at various Universities, Colleges, Schools and Government Institutions. He currently teaches Archaeology and allied disciplines at the Centre for Extra-Mural Studies, University of Mumbai.

  • Smita Dalvi

    Smita Dalvi

    Smita Dalvi teaches architecture in Navi Mumbai and Mumbai. Her special interest lies in Indo-Islamic Art and Architecture on which she has delivered several guest lectures in India and abroad. In 2007, she was awarded the fellowship of 'Fulbright Visiting Specialist: Direct Access to the Muslim world'. Her research areas are in Architecture, Cultural History and Urban Heritage and she has read and published papers and articles in conferences and several architectural and cultural journals. In her research, she explores syncretism in art, architecture and society. She is an avid traveller and photographer. Currently, she is pursuing her doctoral studies at IIT- Bombay on the subject of Architecture and Cinema.

  • Abhijit Dandekar

    Abhijit Dandekar

    Abhijit Dandekar is Assistant Professor of Epigraphy and Numismatics at the Deccan College Postgraduate and Research Institute, Pune. He received his doctorate in 2001 for his studies on Early Historic Ceramics of Mewar, Rajasthan. He specialises in Epigraphy, Numismatics, Ceramic Studies, Field Archaeology, Early Historic and Medieval Archaeology. He has edited volumes, research articles in national and international journals, as well as popular articles to his credit. Dr. Dandekar has directed the excavations and surveys at Chaul in 2008.

  • Vishal Dar

    Vishal Dar

    Vishal K Dar is a visual artist based in Delhi. Dar's art displays a playful approach to the use of material, media and technology.

  • Asok Das

    Asok Das

    Dr. Asok Kumar Das, an eminent scholar on Mughal Painting, was awarded his Ph.D. degree from the University of London in the History of Art. He worked as Director, Maharaja Sawai Man Singh II Museum, Jaipur. His teaching career spanned Visva Bharati University as Satyajit Ray Chair and Jawaharlal Nehru University as visiting Professor. He has written extensively on Mughal Art. His monograph ‘Wonders of Nature: Ustad Mansur at the Mughal Court’ was published by Marg Foundation in December 2012.

  • Richard Davis

    Richard Davis

    Richard Davis is currently Professor of Religion and Asian Studies Programs at Bard College. He is the author of several books and publications, including "Global India circa 100 CE: South Asia in Early World History", "Lives of Indian Images and Ritual in an Oscillating Universe: Worshiping Siva in Medieval India".

  • Harsha V. Dehejia

    Harsha V. Dehejia

    Harsha V. Dehejia is Professor of Indian Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa., ON., Canada. His special interest is in Aesthetics. He has published extensively, curated exhibitions and made a documentary film. Two of his books, Celebrating Krishna (Mapin) and Akriti toSanskriti (Niyogi) have won awards for the best Art book of the year in 1998 and 2010. He is also a pracitising medical doctor. He divides his time between Ottawa and Mumbai.

  • Vidya Dehejia

    Vidya Dehejia

    Vidya Dehejia is Barbara Stoler Miller Professor of Indian Art at Columbia University. She was awarded the Padma Bhushan by the President of India for exceptional contribution to art and education. Dehejia has also been appointed to the Mario Miranda Visiting Research Professorship at the Goa University. Over the years her work has ranged from Buddhist art of the centuries BC to the esoteric temples of North India, and from the sacred bronzes of South India to art under the British Raj.

  • Devangana Desai

    Devangana Desai

    Dr. Devangana Desai, art historian, is the author of Art and Icon –Essays on Early Indian Art, 2013, Khajuraho - Monumental Legacy, 2000, The Religious Imagery of Khajuraho, 1996, Erotic Sculpture of India - A Socio-Cultural Study, 1985, and over ninety papers on various aspects of Ancient Indian Art. Dr. Desai is General Editor of the Monumental Legacy Series on the World Heritage Sites in India, being published by Oxford University Press. Dr. Desai is Trustee of the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS), Mumbai, and Sarabhai Foundation, Ahmedabad. She was Editor, Journal of the Asiatic Society of Mumbai, from 1992 to 2009. She is awarded the Hirayama Prize 2015 of Institut de France, Paris, for “the totality of researches in the field of Indian Art”. A Festschrift, entitled Art, Icon and Architecture in South Asia –Essays in Honour of Dr. Devangana Desai in two volumes, was edited by Anila Verghese and Anna Dallapiccola in 2015. Her Website: devanganadesai.com. She is associated with the Jnanapravaha (Mumbai) Aesthetic lecture series since the beginning

  • Prajna Desai

    Prajna Desai

    Dr. Prajna Desai is a writer of fiction and non fiction and an academic editor. She was trained as an art historian specialising in Pre-Columbian art and architecture. As a teaching fellow and adjunct faculty she taught for several years variously at Yale University, the College of Staten Island, Stern College for Women, and USC, in the United States.

  • Faisal Devji

    Faisal Devji

    Dr Faisal Devji is University Reader in Modern South Asian History at the University of Oxford. He is the Director of the Asian Studies Centre. He has held faculty positions at the New School in New York, Yale University and the University of Chicago, from where he also received his PhD in Intellectual History. He is a Fellow at New York University’s Institute of Public Knowledge, and was Yves Otramane Chair at the Graduate Institute in Geneva. Dr Devji is the author of four books, the latest being 'Muslim Zion: Pakistan as a Political Idea' (2013). He is interested in Indian political thought as well as that of modern Islam. Devji’s broader concerns have to do with ethics and violence in a globalized world.

  • G. N. Devy

    G. N. Devy

    Ganesh Devy, a literary scholar and cultural activist, writes in three languages – Marathi, Gujarati and English. Till 1996 he taught English literature at the M. S. University of Baroda. He left his academic position to take up conservation of threatened languages in India.
    Among the several institutions he founded since then are the Bhasha Research & Publication Centre, Budhan Theatre and the Adivasi Academy.
    He has put to script for the first time for 11 languages existing in oral traditions, promoted and published literature in 26 languages, helped educating in non-formal schools over 20,000 children from indigenous communities and has established economic empowerment activities in 2200 villages in tribal districts of Guajrat. Devy has campaigned for protection of the rights of nomadic and other discriminated tribes and has been Advisor to the Government of India on these issues.
    Devy’s major publications in English include In Another Tongue (1993), Tradition and Modernity (1997), Painted Words(2002), Indian Literary Criticism: Theory and Interpretation (2002), A Nomad Called Thief: Reflections on Adivasi Voice and Silence (2006) and Indigeneity: Expression and Representation (2008). The G. N. Devy Reader (Orient Blackswan) containing four of his book length essays was published in 2009.

  • Renate Dohmen

    Renate Dohmen

    Renate Dohmen is lecturer in art history at the Open University. Her book Encounters beyond the Gallery: Relational Aesthetics and Cultural Difference examines issues of contemporary art, aesthetics, anthropology and the global. She has published essays on cosmopolitanism, and explores transcultural perspectives in contemporary art as well as in colonial visual cultures with a focus on British India. She is editor of the section on British India in Art and its Global Histories: A Reader, co-author and editor of Art and Empire: British India.

  • Mladen Dolar

    Mladen Dolar

    Mladen Dolar taught for 20 years in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, where he now works as a Senior Research Fellow. He is the author of a number of books, most recently (with Slavoj Žižek) 'Opera’s Second Death'.

  • Saryu Doshi

    Saryu Doshi

    Dr. Saryu Doshi is a research scholar, an art historian, a curator and an editor. Her primary research interests lie in the field of Indian Classical and Contemporary Art. During her tenure as Hon. Director at the National Gallery of Modern Art, Mumbai she curated thirteen major exhibitions. She was Pro-term Chairman of the Lalit Kala Academy before which she was the Hon. Editor of Marg Publications. She served on the boards of various universities, academic and cultural institutions as well as government institutions. A recipient of the Padmashree award in 1999, she was also awarded the “Order of the Star of Italian Solidarity” by the Italian Government in 2008.

  • Stella Dupuis

    Stella Dupuis

    Stella Dupuis a Swiss novelist, an inexhaustible traveller, has worked extensively on the Yogini temples of India.

  • John E.Cort

    John E.Cort

    John E.Cort is Professor of Asian and Comparative Religions and holds the Judy Gentili Chair in International Studies at Denison University in Granville, Ohio. Author of Jains in the World: Religious Values and Ideology in India (2001), Framing the Jina: Narratives of Icons and Idols in Jain History (2010) and many articles on the Jains, he received a Guggenheim Fellowship for 2017-18.

  • Massumeh Farhad

    Massumeh Farhad

    Massumeh Farhad joined the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in 1995 as Associate Curator of Islamic Art. In 2004, she was appointed Chief Curator and Curator of Islamic Art and since 2019, she has served as Interim Deputy Director for Collections and Research. She is a specialist in the arts of the book from sixteenth- and seventeenth- century Iran. Farhad has curated numerous exhibitions on the arts of the Islamic world at the Freer and Sackler, including Art of the Persian Courts (1996), Fountains of Light: The NuhadEs-Said Collection of Metalwork (2000), Love and Yearning: Mystical and Moral Themes in Persian Painting (2003), Style and Status: Imperial Costumes from Ottoman Turkey (2005-6), The Tsars and the East: Gifts from Turkey and Iran in the Moscow Kremlin (2009), Falnama: The Book of Omens(2009- 10) and The Art of Qur’an: Treasures from the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Art (2016-17).
    She received her Ph.D. in Islamic Art History from Harvard University in 1987 and has written extensively on seventeenth-century Persian painting, co-authored Slaves of the Shah: New Elites in Safavid Iran (2004) and Falnama: The Book of Omens (2009), and The Art of Qur’an: Treasures from the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Art (2016).

  • Finbarr Barry Flood

    Finbarr Barry Flood

    Finbarr Barry Flood is William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Humanities at the Institute of Fine Arts and Department of Art History, New York University. He has published on Islamic architectural history and historiography, cross-cultural dimensions of Islamic art, image theory, technologies of representation, and Orientalism. Recent books include Objects of Translation: Material Culture and Medieval “Hindu-Muslim” Encounter, (2009), awarded the 2011 Ananda K. Coomaraswamy Prize of the Association for Asian Studies, and Globalizing Cultures: Art and Mobility in the Eighteenth Century (2011), co-edited with Nebahat Avcıoğlu. His current book is provisionally entitled Islam and Image: Polemics, Theology and Modernity.