EXPANDING SPACES: PAINTING IN THE MUGHAL SUCCESSOR STATES

EXPANDING SPACES: PAINTING IN THE MUGHAL SUCCESSOR STATES

  • 13 Oct
    2021

    Southasian Painting

    Kavita Singh

EXPANDING SPACES: PAINTING IN THE MUGHAL SUCCESSOR STATES

Image: Women bathing before an architectural panorama, c. 1765. Fayzullah (Indian, active c. 1730–1765). Opaque watercolour and gold on paper; The Cleveland Museum of Art, Gift in honour of Madeline Neves Clapp; Gift of Mrs. Henry White Cannon by exchange; Bequest of Louise T. Cooper; Leonard C. Hanna Jr. Fund; From the Catherine and Ralph Benkaim Collection 2013.344

In the 18th century, the governors of former Mughal provinces in Bengal, Awadh, Hyderabad became de facto sovereigns of what are known as ‘Mughal Successor States.’ Artists who migrated from Delhi to these new centres continued painting in the Mughal style while also developing unique genres. Most notable is the interest in deep landscapes that take the eye on endless journeys. This lecture offers a glimpse into painting in Mughal successor states, an area that is often overlooked.

This Lecture is part of the Postgraduate Southasian Painting Course “ARTS OF THE BOOK IN SOUTH ASIA”
Registration Fee for the course: Rs. 15,000 | Students: Rs. 10,000*.

For registration kindly visit: https://www.jp-india.org/courses/south-asian-painting

*For Student discount & International participants can email us at info@jp-india.org to let us know which course they wish to register for. We will provide our bank details to enable the transfer of course fees. After making the transfer, please email all details of the transfer to us. At this point, international students cannot sign up for courses directly from our website. This issue will be addressed soon!

Please read the Terms and Conditions carefully before registering. 

Duration -

October 13, 2021

Timing: 6:15 - 8:30 PM

Registrations Closed

Kavita Singh

Kavita Singh

Kavita Singh is a Professor at the School of Arts and Aesthetics of Jawaharlal Nehru University where she teaches courses in the history of Indian painting, particularly the Mughal and Rajput schools, and the history and politics of museums. Singh has published on secularism and religiosity, fraught national identities, and the memorialization of difficult histories as they relate to museums in South Asia and beyond. She has also published essays and monographs on aspects of Mughal and Rajput painting, particularly on style as a signifying system. In 2018, she was awarded the Infosys Prize in Humanities and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2020.