Theoretical Foundations

JPM’s postgraduate course in Theoretical Foundations (TF) provides students a rigorous study of critical social, political, anthropological, psychoanalytic, and aesthetic theory. Over two years, JPM’s Academic Director Rohit Goel will offer six, ten-session modules each July, November, and March. Although some modules are similar in name, course material alters from year to year in order to address fresh work published in the various areas of study. Students who successfully complete the attendance (75% of each module’s classes) and writing (a pass final paper) components of three of the six modules will receive a Postgraduate Diploma in Theoretical Foundations from JPM. Those who successfully complete the attendance component of three of the six modules will receive a Postgraduate Certificate in Theoretical Foundations from JPM. And those who successfully complete one or two of the modules, whether they write or not, will receive a Certificate of Completion for each module. In July 2018, TF opens its second, two-year cycle of modules in Theoretical Foundations:

Module I. Orientalism (July 2018)

This module examines “Orientalism,” a discourse that Edward Said announced with the 1978 publication of his eponymous book. Orientalism took the American academy by storm, providing an opportunity for scholars in the humanities and social sciences to think more critically about the relation between knowledge production and the exercise of power in the history of Western colonization of the East. The course begins with a close reading of Said’s text, examining the conditions of possibility for its writing and publication in 1978 as well as its effects on the academy since. We then move to a critical analysis of Said’s so-called Foucaultian analysis of “Orientalism,” comparing it to Foucault’s own understanding of the discourse of Western sexuality. Third, we analyze Marxist challenges to Said’s claim that without “Orientalism,” colonialism could not have happened. The course concludes with an alternative approach to the relation between knowledge and power, one that does not privilege either knowledge (Said) or power (Marxists) at the expense of the other: continental psychoanalysis. 

July 3, 4, 10, 11, 17, 18, 24, 25, 30, 31, 2018

6.30 - 8.30 pm

Fees

Rs. 7,500
(Attendance)
Rs. 10,000
(Attendance and Writing)

Registrations Closed

Module II. Civil War (October - November 2018)

The phenomenon “civil war” has animated philosophers, statesmen, and citizens since ancient Greece. What is the difference between conflicts within the family (“feuds”), within the polis or nation-state (“civil wars”), and between nations of the world (“wars”)? Do we have a theory of civil war? If so, what is it? If not, should we come up with one? How so? This ten-session seminar series traces the history of the concept of “civil war” from ancient Greece, through the Roman Empire and the Crusades, amidst colonialism, during the Cold War, up until our humanitarian present. We will explore the changing meanings of “civil war” through these periods and examine their social, cultural, and political consequences. Key texts will be David Armitage’s recent book, Civil Wars: A History in Ideas and Giorgio Agamben’s Stasis: Civil War as a Political Paradigm. We will also consider the modern and contemporary scholarship on “civil wars” in the social sciences, treating cases such as America, Sri Lanka, and Lebanon. The course aims to provide students a foundational theoretical and empirical understanding of human conflict and violence over time.

October 26, 27 ; November 1, 2, 5, 6, 12, 20, 21, 23, 2018

6.30 – 8.30 pm

Fees

Rs. 7,500
(Attendance)
Rs. 10,000
(Attendance and Writing)

Registrations Closed

Module III. The Emergence of Capitalism in early modern Europe (March - April 2019)

In Capital, Marx offers the most systemic unpacking of the logic of capital and its contradictions, from the post -Industrial Revolution vantage of full-throttled capitalist production. However, in his sections on ‘primitive accumulation’, Marx struggles to explain the historical ‘when, where, why, and how’ of capitalism’s emergence. This course attempts to answer these questions, considering the strongest scholarship on the emergence of capitalism in early modern Europe. In addition to Marx’s attempt, we will consider the efforts of Max Weber (The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism), Giovanni Arrighi (The Long Twentieth Century), Jan de Vries (The Industrious Revolution), Robert Brenner (The Brenner Debates), Kenneth Pomeranz (The Great Divergence), William H. Sewell Jr. (“The Empire of Fashion”), and others.

March 5, 6, 12, 13, 19, 20, 26, 27 ; April 2, 3, 2019

6.30 - 8.30 pm

Fees

Rs. 7,500
(Attendance)
Rs. 10,000
(Attendance and Writing)

Registrations Closed

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  • A copy of your last degree certificate
  • Your CV
  • A passport-sized photograph
     

Duration

01 Jul 2018 - 30 Apr 2019